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Jay`s Treaty Agreement

Jay`s Treaty Agreement

The document, titled “Contract of Amity Commerce and Navigation between His Britannic Majesty and the United States of America,” but commonly known as the Jay Treaty, was officially ratified by President George Washington in August 1795. The debates on the Treaty led Washington to establish a firm protocol on the Constitutional Treaty process. His reaction to the public revolt over the treaty also helped define the role of the executive in organizing the public mood. Instead, the special envoy`s work went to John Jay, the Supreme Justice of the Supreme Court, and with Hamilton and James Madison of The Federalist Papers. Jay had impeccable credentials for the position. He served as President of the Continental Congress, served as U.S. Secretary of State in Spain, and spent five years as Secretary of State in accordance with the Articles of Confederation. However, his appointment sparked his own controversy, not least because he intended to continue as supreme justice. (The Supreme Court of the 1790s had neither the size nor the workload it has today.) Critics have reasonably questioned the relevance of a judge negotiating an agreement on which he could one day rule.

But the deepest problem was that Jay, like Hamilton, preferred Britain to France. Republican senators feared that Jay would sell America`s interests to the British crown. Under the Treaty of Paris, the western border of the United States was established on the east bank of the Mississippi River. However, ten years after American independence, British troops were still occupying part of the Ohio Valley. The unpaid debts owed to the United States that were set out in the treaty had not been paid. American shipping was essentially excluded from British-controlled ports, and in 1794 British ships seized American ships that traded in the French West Indies on the grounds that such trade violated british Council injunctions prohibiting neutral nations from trading with French ports. In the end, the Treaty was adopted by Congress on August 14, 1795, by the two-thirds majority it needed to be adopted; Washington signed the contract four days later. Washington and Jay may have won the legislative battle and temporarily avoided war, but the conflict at home showed a growing division between those in Washington, D.C Jefferson and Madison were wary of Washington`s commitment to maintaining friendly relations with England over revolutionary France, which would have welcomed the United States as partners in an expanded war against England. When Thomas Jefferson became president in 1801, he did not refuse the contract. He kept federalist Minister Rufus King in London to negotiate a fruitful solution to the outstanding issues regarding cash payments and limits. . .

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